Secrets Of Vitamins K1 And K2

Magic Behind Vitamin K

Seamus Slater

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Vitamin K1 is essential for the formation of blood clots and the metabolism of bone. So if you’re deficient in vitamin K1, you may experience bruises, or if you cut yourself and your blood is clotting slowly, you may be poor in vitamin K1. Likewise, if your wound is taking an unusually long time to clot or heal, you may be deficient in vitamin K1. In addition, if you have bleeding gums when you wash your teeth, this could be due to a vitamin C shortage, but it could also be due to a lack of vitamin K1. In other words, if you don’t have enough vitamin K1 and you get injured, you could potentially bleed to death inside or externally if you don’t have enough of it.
Consequently, our bodies have ensured that we never run out of vitamin K1. Because there are so many different foods that we consume that contain vitamin K1, it’s doubtful you will be deficient, especially considering that the requirement for K1 is not even milligrammes but rather micrograms. As a result, we only had a small quantity of money to meet the needs. Now, where does vitamin K1 come from? It is mainly obtained from plant sources.

Now, we can find vitamin K in animal meals, but not in the quantities that you would find in leafy green vegetables or other plants. Now, vitamin K2 is critical in regulating calcium levels and functions. As a result, there is no accumulation of calcium in your vascular system. This has everything to do with bone strength, as it maintains calcium in the bones and out of soft tissues, which is essential for bone health. And vitamin K2 is primarily found in animal products such as animal fat. Still, we can also find it in fermented foods such as Neda, a fermented soybean, and sauerkraut. Still, it is particularly abundant in beef liver, pork liver, pork proteins, chicken or beef, egg yolks, and soft cheeses. So you can see right away that our bodies were designed to ingest both plant and animal foods to obtain the nutrients that our bodies require. It would help if you now understood that Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin. As a result, the vitamin K1 found in plants is poorly absorbed. In reality, you only take less than 10% of it while holding something you don’t need much of, and it’s absorbed very poorly as a result.

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Seamus Slater

Writer, Internet Marketer, Human Rights advocate using in your face attitude, fighting injustice implied by big tech and big pharma. https://slatercloud.online